A number of weeks ago, I wrote about my visits to the 2014 Craft and Quilting Fairs and at the Canberra fair, I attended a workshop on resin jewellery run by Beads N Crystals. Brisbane based, Beads N Crystals run all kinds of workshops and if their workshop at the fair is anything to go by, I’d love to try many more of their workshops, check them out if you are ever in the Brisbane area.

For a long time resin jewellery was one of those crafts that I had always wanted to try but never known how to do it or even what supplies I needed. It always seemed to be one of those really difficult crafts, but as I took my seat at the resin workshop I looked over to see three young girls that looked to be about 10 years old, I felt a little more confident. Surly if they let young children do the workshop it would be easier than I had imagined. I really needn’t have worried, it was so incredibly easy to do.

In the workshop we used a liquid gloss resin called Magic-Glos™. This particular resin required no mixing and is cured by exposure to UV light, either sunlight or UV light bulbs. We each made two necklace pendants using bezel settings for both, one with rice paper and clear resin and the other with resin and resin dye. Both results were beautiful and once they were cured under the UV light they were ready to wear.

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Inspired to continue making resin jewellery I purchased a resin kit and a few bezel settings. The kit I purchased is called Ice Resin™, and more economical resin than the Magic-Glos™. Ice resin™ is also an air-dried instead of UV curing resin which is good for the gloomy climate of Canberra. Ice Resin™ can be coloured with any colours, dyes or paints, you can even add glitter to it. You can use the resin on photos and paper once sealed, which you can do by coating Elmer’s glue on each side.

The instructions for the Ice Resin™ say that you need to mix up a full 1oz batch of resin at a time. I thought I would make a few different items to test the resin out. However, I still had a lot of resin left over which you cannot reuse once the curing possess has begun.

For my first real world attempt at working with resin, I decided to make three items, a wedding photo pendant, a girly glittery pendant and a small-scale version of an artwork technique that I’ve been dreaming about doing for a long time, but more about this one in a future post.

There are quite a few supplies needed for these projects;

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  1. Disposable gloves – this can get VERY messy and the resin is quite difficult to get off your hands
  2. A working surface that you can bin afterwards, it WILL get ruined! I covered a hard placemat in paper so that I could move the surface around with ease then I’ll just bin the paper
  3. The two parts of the resin
  4. Measuring container – comes in kit
  5. Additional containers to mix small amounts of the resin with colouring
  6. Stirring sticks – the icy pole type sticks come in the kit but if you run our you could also use skewers which aren’t as good but better than nothing.
  7. Colouring, you can get specialty dies but you can also use oil or acrylic paints
  8. A lid, container, thick piece of card that you can prop up above the items whilst they are curing to protect them from dust

Items specific to the individual pendants are;

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Wedding Photo Pendant

  • A large oval bezel pendant
  • A copy of a photo from our wedding cut into an oval shape smaller than the bezel
  • Resin coloured burgundy
  • Clear resin

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Girly Glittery Pendant

  • A bezel pendant of any size or shape
  • Silver glitter
  • Resin coloured in pink
  • Resin coloured in purple
  • Resin Coloured in burgundy
  • Clear resin

Wedding Photo Pendant

  • Following the instructions in the Ice Resin kit mix up the resin – read the instructions carefully
  • Pour a small amount into one of the small containers and thoroughly mix in a very small amount of paint
  • Sit the bezel on a stirring stick so that the bail sits over the edge, otherwise the resin with settle unevenly in the bezel

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  • Slowly part-fill the bezel with the coloured resin, just enough to cover the surface of the bezel so the resin is opaque
  • Cover the pendant with cardboard, lid or a container to protect it from getting dust on it, make sure that you raise the cover up off the pendant to allow plenty of air flow

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  • Curing time will depend on the temperature and humidity of your space but let it sit for at least few hours before moving on

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  • Following the instructions in the Ice Resin kit mix up another batch of resin
  • Position the photo in place on the hard coloured resin
  • Pour clear resin over the photo, filling the bezel to the top, the resin will self dome a little but be careful not to over fill it or the resin will spill over the edge
  • Cover the pendant with cardboard, lid or a container to protect it from getting dust on it, make sure that you raise the cover up off the pendant to allow plenty of air flow

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Girly Glittery Pendant

  • Following the instructions in the Ice Resin kit mix up the resin – read the instructions carefully
  • Pour a small amount into two of the small containers and thoroughly mix in a very small amount of paint to each batch, I went with Pink and Purple, I also ended up putting a little of the burgundy resin form the other pendant
  • Sit the bezel on a stirring stick so that the bail sits over the edge, otherwise the resin with settle unevenly in the bezel
  • Slowly part-fill the bezel with the different coloured resins
  • Using the sharp end of a skewer swirl the colours together to create a pattern that you like, it can be as mixed or separated as you like
  • Cover the pendant with cardboard, lid or a container to protect it from getting dust on it, make sure that you raise the cover up off the pendant to allow plenty of air flow
  • Curing time will depend on the temperature and humidity of your space but let it sit for at least few hours before moving on
  • Following the instructions in the Ice Resin kit mix up another batch of resin
  • Mix in some glitter with the clear resin
  • Pour the glittery clear resin over the dried coloured resin, the resin will self dome a little but be careful not to over fill it or the resin will spill over the edge

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  • Cover the pendant with cardboard, lid or a container to protect it from getting dust on it, make sure that you raise the cover up off the pendant to allow plenty of air flow

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For more detailed instructions on using Ice Resin™ and tips and tricks check out their website and YouTube channel.

 

After using both the Magic-Glos™ and the Ice Resin™ I would have to say that the Magic-Glos™ is easier to use and is great for small items or batches. However, if you are going to be doing large quantities then I would suggest Ice Resin™, although it is a bit more labour intensive per batch it is a lot cheaper and the results between the two are very comparable.

Resin is absolutely one of those mediums where the saying “a little goes a long way” is so true. I have SO much resin left, are there any resin projects or techniques that you would like me to try out for you? I have to do something with all this resin; I can only wear so many pendants!

 

EHC_love Beck

 

 

3 comments on “Resin Jewellery”

  1. I could think of a million projects to make with resin! You could make a whole heap of pendants/keyrings etc and sell them on etsy?

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